Bullet-resistant glass with SentryGlas® interlayer provides maximum protection for occupants, while maintaining a modern, transparent appearance for San Francisco Public Safety Building

Bullet-resistant glass with SentryGlas® ionoplast interlayer has been installed on the majority of the exterior facades on the new San Francisco Public Safety Building, ensuring maximum protection of the building and its occupants, while also maintaining a modern, open, transparent look and feel.


When glass plies are combined in a laminate with ductile, energy absorbing plastic interlayers, the laminated glass can be very effective in preventing bullets from penetrating through the glazing and causing injury to occupants inside the building.
Bullet-resistant glass with laminates made with SentryGlas<sup>®</sup> is installed on the majority of the building’s exterior facades.

Funded by the Earthquake Safety and Emergency Response Bond (ESER) passed by San Francisco voters in 2010, the recently-completed San Francisco Public Safety Building is a 301,000 square feet (28,000 m2) building designed by international architect firm HOK, in collaboration with San Francisco-based company Mark Cavagnero Associates.

The seismically-safe, energy-efficient building – which is designed to achieve LEED gold certification – houses the police administrative headquarters, a relocated district police station, a new district fire station and fleet vehicle parking. The building is designed to be fully operational after a major seismic event, with up to 100 hours of backup for water, waste and power.

The building comprises two wings connected to a central core to form a Z-shaped plan. A four-level tower forms two outward facing courtyards atop the podium. The tower’s energy-efficient exterior skin is easily maintained. A glass curtain wall allows office floors to take advantage of stunning views and natural light, while providing an appearance reflecting ‘open’ government.

With its varied densities of patterned frit, the west façade balances daylight and mechanical constraints, while creating an identity that sets it apart from traditional office buildings in the area. A louvered screen frame wraps the north and south façade, providing sun control. The new building was needed because the previous Hall of Justice was more than 50 years old. It was overcrowded, functionally obsolete, energy inefficient, seismically challenged and in need of repairs.


Learn more about the San Francisco Public Safety Building by downloading the case study: